The newest part of the Australian Government’s policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions came into operation from 1 July 2016.

Called the Safeguard Mechanism, it allocates ‘responsible emitters’ reported baselines or gives them the opportunity to submit a ‘calculated baseline application’ where the proposed reported emissions baseline does not reflect a facility’s future emissions.

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The newest part of the Australian Government’s policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions came into operation from 1 July 2016.

This month marks the closure of automotive manufacturing for Ford in Australia. Next year will see GM and Toyota finish their production run.

This event represents an opportunity to reflect on what might have been, and to try to understand what lessons arise.

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‘This isn’t a story about an industry needing more government assistance – it’s one about being smarter in the way the money was spent.’

The World Economic Forum has just released its 2016-17 Global Competitiveness Index (GCI), ranking Australia 22 out of 138 economies, behind a top four of Switzerland, Singapore, the United States and the Netherlands.

The index is the result of surveys and questionnaires involving business leaders in participating countries, and assesses the competitiveness of economies across the world by combining three broad indices which respectively measure basic requirements, efficiency enhancers, and innovation and sophistication.

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Australia ranks (only) 22nd out of 138 countries in the World Economic Forum’s latest Global Competitiveness Index.

A ground swell has been building

The last two to three years has seen a ground swell of opinion build, which we believe can’t be ignored.  The way advanced nations have been managing work health and safety (WHS) for decades (by looking for and measuring what can go wrong) appears to have reached saturation point with respect to its growing usefulness.

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The ground swell of opinion from leading thinkers is health and safety management needs to move from ensuring that ‘as few things as possible go wrong’ to ensuring that ‘as many things as possible go right.’

First the good news. Australia’s economy (as measured by GDP) continues to grow at a very healthy rate. We’re recording solid jobs growth – some 190,000 over the past year –  and our unemployment rate is holding under 6% in a tough global environment.

We’ve also just chalked up 25 years without a recession – that is genuinely an excellent result.

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Australia’s 25 years without a recession – an excellent result. But household debt is a genuine concern

What does a coal miner’s working roster in China have to do with Australia’s export income and the well-publicised budget deficit? Quite a bit it turns out.

Last week the Federal parliament reached agreement on a package of measures which will help to reduce our budget deficit by $6.3 billion over the next four years – as spending on the baby bonus is removed, funding for the Australian Renewable Energy Agency is reduced by $460 million and Family Tax Benefit Part A for families on more than $80,000 a year is scaled back.

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What does a coal miner’s working roster in China have to do with Australia’s export income and the well-publicised budget deficit? Quite a bit it turns out.

Digital disruption is real. It has real implications on today’s work, workers and workplace – and not just in the private sector.

All levels of government across Australia are challenged by siloed structures, bureaucratic processes and complex legacy systems and as such are grappling with how to seize digital opportunities in the way they deliver essential services and manage their workforces.

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It’s vital that the the government proactively re-imagines how the workplace can better enable the digital work and the digital worker.

The Federal Government has dumped the controversial superannuation $500,000 lifetime non-concessional contribution cap and replaced it with an annual limit of $100,000. An individual under 65 can continue to ‘bring forward’ three years’ non-concessional contributions.

In addition, an individual with a super balance of more than $1.6 million will no longer be eligible to make non-concessional contributions. It is expected all these change will commence from 1 July 2017.

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An individual with a super balance of more than $1.6 million will no longer be eligible to make non-concessional contributions.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) release of the Q2 2016 National Accounts last week officially marked 25 years of continuous economic growth of the Australian economy – a remarkable achievement. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth was 0.5% for the June quarter and 3.3% for the year to June.

This recent growth was broadly led by a strong increase in public expenditure (of 4.5% for the quarter) and dwelling investment (1.6% for the quarter), with modest growth in consumer spending observed as well (0.4% for the quarter).

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This economic growth was broadly led by a strong increase in public expenditure and dwelling investment , with modest growth in consumer spending observed.

During his recent visit to Hangzhou for the G20 summit, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull defended Australia’s position in relation to foreign investment from China.

This followed last month’s decision, announced by Treasurer Scott Morrison, and following assessment by the Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB), to block the sale of NSW electricity provider Ausgrid, to Chinese and Hong Kong bidders.

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The flow of direct investment from China into Australia has been outstripping that going the other way for some years now.